Text Size
×

Warning

JUser: :_load: Unable to load user with ID: 812
  • How much is it to Join? +

    As a carer you can join for as little as £60!

    If you would like to join as a Shared Lives Scheme then do get in touch with us for further information on Pricing

    To join simply email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more details.

  • How do I join as a carer? +

    To join as a Shared Lives carer, you must be currently approved to provide Shared Lives care by a registered Shared Lives (or Adult Placement) scheme in the UK.

    Shared Lives carers make their home available as a resource and may provide Shared Lives support to up to three people at any one time (some Shared Lives schemes have a local limit of two people).

    Unlike care homes, Shared Lives carers do not employ staff to provide care to the people who they support. You can join as an individual, or with your partner, if s/he is also a Shared Lives carer.

  • What should I expect as a member? +

    As a member, you can expect: - Use of the free Shared Lives carers’ confidential helpline where you can obtain information advice and support from a dedicated national Carers Development Worker.

    - FREE legal expenses cover (up to a maximum of £25000) if you have an allegation made against you as a Shared Lives carer resulting in you being taken to court and/or your Scheme is seekingto de-approve you as a carer.

    - Free access to a legal helpline which you can use for advice on any relevant legal issue.

    - Public Liability Insurance at a preferential rate as well as access to other insurance provision developed to meet the needs of Shared Lives carers.

    - Three Shared Lives carer newsletters a year via post, which keep you up to date.- The opportunity to meet or get in touch with other carers, including through meetings, telephone conferences, an email group and a message board.

    - A members-only area of the website containing resources which are free to members

    Access to a wide range of toolkits and resources at members-only prices.

    - Access to our annual Shared Lives carers’ breaks and conference.

    - A conference for your home nation and/or for the UK, with a limited number of places for Shared Lives carers at supported rates.

    - An open invitation to attend national network meetings (and regional meetings in England).- At least one seat on the board of Shared Lives Plus for an elected Shared Lives carer.

    - A voice with local, regional and national decision makers and a programme of awareness-raising about Shared Lives and the work of Shared Lives carers.

  • How do I pay? +

    You can pay via cheque, bank card and credit card.
  • 1

FAQ

Questions and Answers

Wednesday, 17 December 2014 00:00

You made us feel important

Written by
Thanks to Cathy Gregg, who manages the Shared Lives scheme in Richmond, who shared (with permission) this letter from a family member whose mother uses Shared Lives:
Thursday, 18 December 2014 06:12

Shared Lives is never closed for Christmas.

Written by
Shared Lives is never closed for Christmas.
Thursday, 18 December 2014 12:38

Not rocket science

Written by
One of the best things about social media is hearing directly from people who use Shared Lives and Homeshare, and their families, about their experiences. I am an avid follower of ‘Doris’, who tweets about her perhaps unique use of Shared Lives day support and a Homesharer to live well with a mental health condition. […]
Sunday, 21 December 2014 07:51

Returning it with interest

Written by
I was asked to say a few words about empowering communities as part of the National Voices session with NHS England Chief Exec, Simon Stevens, about his Five Year Forward View. I chose to talk about collaboration. (If you’re interested in collaborative health and care, you will be interested in the Coalition for Collaborative Care. The C4CC is working on joined up, personalised, community orientated healthcare and has strong links with Think Local, Act Personal which has been bringing those values to social care for some years now.) Here’s roughly what I said:

The NHS has many challenges – all of them big, many of them complex, some of them truly wicked. Or at least, seen as ‘wicked’, because they don’t respond to the things that services are currently good at. Of those challenges, perhaps the key one is how the health and care system can collaborate with the quarter of our population who have a long term condition, in order that people with long term conditions can live well. We need to achieve that because the NHS can (and does) do many wonderful things, some of them verging on the miraculous, but it can’t ‘fix’ a quarter of the population. And only people themselves can build good lives in good places; that’s something that services can support and enable, but not do for us.

All health and care interventions can be offered collaboratively, not just community-based interventions like Shared Lives, in which someone gets the support and care they need in an ordinary family home, but also acute and hospital-based services.

Collaborative leaders devolve money and power to enable personal tailoring of services, whilst helping those with personal budgets and Personal Health Budgets to work together to co-design new kinds of services. Conversely, commissioners will always fail the collaboration test when they organise services distantly, for large numbers of people. Professionals fail the collaboration test when they see people as customers and even family carers as just another set of clients with needs. Collaborative professionals have the humility to arrange their work around the capabilities and potential of citizens and carers. They share their knowledge, they make things simple and they are keen to accessible in an emergency.

This ability to collaborate with citizens, families and communities is perhaps the key voluntary sector offer to the NHS. But whilst the voluntary sector is far more capable of achieving that collaboration than the statutory sector, it’s important to admit that charities, social enterprises and community groups don’t always succeed in doing so. Many small community groups are embedded in the right relationships with communities, but lack the health and care expertise. Some large national charities have that expertise but have become unmoored from the communities which built them.

So there is a challenge for all sectors: to demonstrate that we have the insight, courage and humility to make hard, uncomfortable changes towards shared purpose, shared resources, shared knowledge and shared ownership. To recognise that we start to collaborate with citizens and their communities not when we deign to engage or consult with them, but when we return to them, with interest, the power, money and knowledge we have all borrowed.

Thursday, 08 January 2015 05:59

Shared Lives in Derby

Written by
My colleague Angela Catley of our sister organisation, Community Catalysts has kindly written a guest blog on their work developing Shared Lives in Derby, which is part of the area’s transformation of institutional care for people labelled ‘complex’ or ‘challenging':
Sunday, 11 January 2015 06:12

Growing up sharing my life

Written by
This job really is a privilege sometimes. We’ve been looking at what it’s like for children growing up in Shared Lives households and I’m very grateful to Niamh, aged 12, who has written the account below of growing up sharing your life, which I think you’ll agree is absolutely brilliant. Thanks also to Niamh’s family including her Dad Martin, who shared this with us and Carole and the team at their Shared Lives scheme, run by Rotherham Council:
Tuesday, 13 January 2015 06:07

Our family

Written by
Here is the second in what I hope might be a series of guest blogs from Shared Lives carers and their families talking about what it’s like for children growing up in a Shared Lives household. Many thanks indeed to PossAbilities Shared Lives scheme and to Jamie, Amanda, Jonathan and Thomas and their household for sharing their inspiring story:
Wednesday, 28 January 2015 12:33

It’s ‘voluntary’ but not optional

Written by
I’m re-blogging the post below from http://www.voluntarysectorhealthcare.org.uk/vcse-review/ which is the website for a review of investment in the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector which I’m chairing on behalf of a group of VCSE organisations and the Department of Health, NHS England and Public Health England. The review is based on the view set out in all of those bodies’ strategies and visions for the kind of enabling, collaborative and community-based approach to achieving health and wellbeing which could only be achieved with a thriving and valued VCSE sector. In other words, a sector which might be known as ‘voluntary’, but which cannot be seen as optional:

PRESS RELEASE - 22/10/14

Young Women from Bedfordshire star in film premiere at The House of Commons

Three young women with additional support needs from Bedfordshire are starring in a film premiered at the House of Commons, impressing a host of MP’s with a heartfelt speech about their lives. As part of Shared Lives Week, the young women featured in a short film which shows Clare Cattani, 20, Ayisha Assan, 26, and Joanne Leach, 32, talking about how their lives have been transformed by the kindness and dedication of their Shared Lives carers Graham and Lorna Trow.

Thursday, 30 October 2014 00:00

SHARED LIVES PLUS – LIVERPOOL AND AROUND THE UK

Written by

LIVERPOOL ECHO

SHARED LIVES PLUS – LIVERPOOL AND AROUND THE UK

Debbie lived in care for most of her life, she never really settled anywhere and found it difficult to talk or make eye contact. Without any family around her, Debbie who has learning difficulties, felt isolated and frightened. In her own words Debbie says Shared Lives transformed her life as she now lives with a family: ‘I am much happier living here. In the other homes I did not feel loved and people were mean to me.

Page 30 of 30

FAQ Didn't Solve Your Problem?

Get Direct Access to the Team Via Phone, Email or Live Chat.

Contact Us

If you have not received new LOG IN details in the last few days then you will be unable to log in here until you have done so. Please do not attempt to log in as you will be locked out

Thank you for logging in. Now please feel free to visit the private sections of the site.