• How much is it to Join? +

    As a carer you can join for as little as £60!

    If you would like to join as a Shared Lives Scheme then do get in touch with us for further information on Pricing

    To join simply email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more details.

  • How do I join as a carer? +

    To join as a Shared Lives carer, you must be currently approved to provide Shared Lives care by a registered Shared Lives (or Adult Placement) scheme in the UK.

    Shared Lives carers make their home available as a resource and may provide Shared Lives support to up to three people at any one time (some Shared Lives schemes have a local limit of two people).

    Unlike care homes, Shared Lives carers do not employ staff to provide care to the people who they support. You can join as an individual, or with your partner, if s/he is also a Shared Lives carer.

  • What should I expect as a member? +

    As a member, you can expect: - Use of the free Shared Lives carers’ confidential helpline where you can obtain information advice and support from a dedicated national Carers Development Worker.

    - FREE legal expenses cover (up to a maximum of £25000) if you have an allegation made against you as a Shared Lives carer resulting in you being taken to court and/or your Scheme is seekingto de-approve you as a carer.

    - Free access to a legal helpline which you can use for advice on any relevant legal issue.

    - Public Liability Insurance at a preferential rate as well as access to other insurance provision developed to meet the needs of Shared Lives carers.

    - Three Shared Lives carer newsletters a year via post, which keep you up to date.- The opportunity to meet or get in touch with other carers, including through meetings, telephone conferences, an email group and a message board.

    - A members-only area of the website containing resources which are free to members

    Access to a wide range of toolkits and resources at members-only prices.

    - Access to our annual Shared Lives carers’ breaks and conference.

    - A conference for your home nation and/or for the UK, with a limited number of places for Shared Lives carers at supported rates.

    - An open invitation to attend national network meetings (and regional meetings in England).- At least one seat on the board of Shared Lives Plus for an elected Shared Lives carer.

    - A voice with local, regional and national decision makers and a programme of awareness-raising about Shared Lives and the work of Shared Lives carers.

  • How do I pay? +

    You can pay via cheque, bank card and credit card.
  • 1

FAQ

Questions and Answers

Watch our UK conference online!

Our UK conference is on Wednesday 22 November. You can watch the opening speeches online, so if you can't make it in person, you can watch from the comfort of your own home or office!  

Please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to receive a log in.

We will also record them, so if you miss it live, you can catch up later. 

Programme

9.15am - Opening speeches to celebrate 25 years of Shared Lives Plus

The Right Worshipful the Lord Mayor, Councillor Malcolm Kennedy

Dyane Aspinall, Interim Director of Adult Social Care, Liverpool City Council, Lisa Capewell and Phoebe Verity Shared Lives Plus Ambassadors

9.45am - “Pack, Bin, Buy – What we do like, what we don’t like and what we would like for our Shared Lives”

Ambassadors - Lisa Capewell, Phoebe Verity and Michael Turner

10.00am - Keynote Speech

Tony Hunter, Chief Executive, Social Care Institute for Excellence

10.30am - time for a cuppa!

Shared Lives Plus are pleased to announce that the NHS will extend free flu vaccines to Shared Lives carers in England. The news comes after Shared Lives Plus showed that Shared Lives carers are supporting thousands of people at risk of flu across the UK and a key part of the health and social care workforce. 

Alex Fox, Shared Lives Plus, CEO, said, 

“We are delighted that Shared Lives carers have been recognised for their incredible work supporting thousands of people who need extra support to live well. We want all Shared Lives carers to have the opportunity to lead healthy lives and support the wellbeing of everyone who they share their lives and home with. This is just one example of the power of our Membership and our work with the NHS which values the incredible work carers do every day.”

NHS England will confirm the date that Shared Lives carers in England can get a flu jab after GPs and pharmacists have been informed.  

We encourage Members in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales to use this decision by NHS England to talk with their health authorities, so that Shared Lives carers can protect themselves with the flu jab, as they are a key part of the health and social care workforce.

Alex Morton, NHS, Director of Commissioning explained, “Flu immunisation should be provided to health and social care staff… who are directly involved in the care of vulnerable clients who are at increased risk from exposure to influenza, meaning those in a clinical risk group or aged 65 years and over. We believe that Shared Lives carers, recruited and approved by any of 120 local CQC-registered Shared Lives schemes, would be covered by the extension as they are part of the regulated social care workforce directly involved in providing care to vulnerable patients/clients who are at increased risk.”

He continued, “The announcement of the scheme to vaccinate this population group does not replace existing occupational health schemes or access to the flu vaccination for at risk groups, including those with health conditions or those over 65, some of whom may be Sharing Lives carers.”

Dame Sally Davies, Chief Medical Officer encouraged: “The harsh reality is that flu can kill and the best way to protect yourself is to get the jab. With more people eligible than ever before and the vaccine available in more locations, people should protect themselves and those around them from flu. Taking a few minutes to get the jab could save your life this winter.”

Flu jabs have been offed to 21 million people. The national drive marks the start of Stay Well This Winter, an initiative from Public Health England and NHS England to help the most vulnerable people prepare for winter and avoid having to visit hospital due to common winter illnesses. Flu is a serious illness in vulnerable people, potentially causing deaths and complications such as pneumonia. We would encourage Shared Lives carers to take up the offer of immunisation to protect themselves, their families and the people they care for.

Shared Lives carers are advised to take ID or a letter from their scheme saying they are approved and if needed, pdfSC_flu_care_orgs_letter_FINAL.pdf

More information from NHS

  • National leaders need to listen as 17,000 people in care home doubtBen Hall 091117
  • High quality care homes stop offering residential care for older people
  • Scotland needs new ways to support and care for people

17,000 people who live in, or receive care from Britain’s second largest care home operator, Four Seasons, are today left in doubt about where they live, as the private equity firm Terra Firma pleads with lenders to approve a financial rescue package for it. Four Seasons was saddled with huge debts to its own owners after they bought the care provider in 2012. This £220m debt, loaned at 15%, will earn Terra Firma £660m by 2022. The financial struggles emerged today as part of the Paradise Papers leaks.

But it is the small signs, like the canary in the coalmine, that we need to listen to. Last week, Bield Housing, a high quality care provider, made the decision to withdraw from running residential care homes across Scotland, on the basis that this is no longer a viable financial business due to falling funding from local authorities.

The decision by Bield, although small by comparison, is the more profound. When a high quality provider walks away from an industry saying it is uneconomic, then our national leaders need to listen.

These two very different examples show, more clearly than ever, that we need new ways of caring in order to provide the dignity and care to our older family members.

There are options.

Using Shared Lives, older people can live in their own home and communities for longer. Their paid Shared Lives carer supports them to continue to live the life they know, their friendships, their families and their communities. Delaying the move into residential care leads to better lives for older people and their relatives who know their elderly parent is cared for by someone they have got to know and trust.

Alternatively using Homeshare, older people are matched with someone who needs a place to live and wants to share some of their time. The curses of loneliness and housing dealt with simultaneously.

There are always other ways to do things, let's not allow the greed of private equity and the collapse of an industry to destroy the lives of our parents.

You can contact Ben Hall This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Growing Shared Lives in my area

Strategic advice and support for local authority and health commissioners

“My Shared Lives carers helped turn on the light in my darkest times, when no one else could, and through that, I was able to grow as a person and find happiness. True happiness.”
Leanne, 20, who found support through Shared Lives.

Turning stories into numbers - My Shared Life

If all areas caught up with the best performing, around 34,944 people would be supported in Shared Lives arrangements with actual total annual savings of over £225 million in addition to cost avoidance with reduced trips to A&E, GPs, hospital admissions and reduced reliance on community health services.

Read about our work with local authority and health commissioners

Transformation programmes such as NHS England’s Integrated Personalised Commissioning (IPC) programme, describe a whole-system change towards an experience of health and care services which is more personalised, more empowering and less isolating.

Local systems tend to agree with these changes in principle, but struggle with:
• What they look like ‘on the ground’ in terms of behaviour changes and new models of care
• How to reconcile those shifts with the day-to-day pressures facing the health and care system
• How to join up NHS and council ‘personalisation’ programmes.
We work with other asset-based organisations, such as those in the recent Six Innovations report, on taking a whole area approach. See inside page to find out more about asset-based thinking in the paper written by our Chief Executive, Alex Fox OBE.

Shared Lives and Homeshare are personalised and community-based models of care and support. Councils, more recently NHS England and a number of CCGs are developing them as integrated care models: a tangible way of embedding asset-based practice.

Total Transformation of Care and Support: Creating the five year forward view for social care

The Asset-based Area

Six Innovations in Social Care

Thursday, 26 October 2017 11:29

Our response to 'Airbnb care rooms'

In response to media coverage 26.10.17

Shared Lives care about people who come out of hospital, especially older people and others who need extra support to live well. Shared Lives is all about the relationship match between Shared Lives carers and people coming out of hospital. We know that when people have chosen who they are going to share with, and are part of a family, they recover more quickly.

We have a long 40 year history of working in social care and we are proven to be one of the safest forms of care – for the last three years 92% of schemes have been rated by the CQC as outstanding or good, and none have been rated inadequate. Local Shared Lives schemes have the back up of a national network and quality assurance, regulation and inspection: this is essential to maintaining the sector’s exceptional safeguarding record.

We welcome innovation in health and social care services, for us it is not about cost-cutting – it’s about putting people first, building strong relationships and safety to recover and live well.

For any other questions, media enquiries, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 07392 313 500.

Read Alex Fox, CEO's blog - 'More than a room'

About Shared Lives

Shared Lives is a long-established, regulated and researched home-based support model which has a long history in social care and more recently has been developed to offer home from hospital and other kinds of healthcare, with the backing of the Dept Health and NHS England.

Shared Lives carers are recruited by their local CQC-registered Shared Lives scheme and put through a rigorous 3 – 6 month approval process, before being carefully matched with an adult who needs support.  Together, they share family and community life. Half of the14,000 people using Shared Lives move in with their Shared Lives carer to live as part of their household; half visit for day support or overnight breaks. 

Shared Lives is used by a people with a wide range of long-term support needs including learning disabilities, mental health problems, physical or sensory impairments. Some are older people with dementia, who typically use Shared Lives instead of visiting a care home when their family needs a break from caring. Some, such as care leavers and young disabled adults, learn independent living skills and put down roots in the community, to enable them to move into their own place without becoming isolated. Home from hospital care is a recent but promising development which has Dept Health funding.

Shared Lives in health

There are nearly 10,000 Shared Lives carers. They are all approved following rigorous recruitment and training by one of the UK’s 150 regulated local schemes. The Care Quality Commission rates Shared Lives as 92% good or excellent: better than all other forms of social care.

NHS England and seven NHS trusts are investing over £2m in scaling up Shared Lives as a new form of healthcare. When Shared Lives is used by, for instance, people recovering from stroke, the same safeguarding and matching processes are adapted to enable the patient to meet a potential Shared Lives carer and make a choice as to whether to stay in their house. The Shared Lives scheme supports and monitors the match. There is also a project specifically at supporting people being discharged from hospital which has funding from the Department of Health and Dunhill Medical Trust in 7 pilot sites.

What is the difference between Shared Lives and ‘Airbnb care rooms’?

The success of Shared Lives, which is now present in almost every UK area, stems from its values and practices which are very different from those reported about ‘care rooms’:

  • The well-being of the person coming out of hospital is put first, along with their choice and match with a Shared Lives carer.
  • Shared Lives carers are trained and paid to support and include someone in their family life, their incentive is not to make money (unlike the reports in the headlines). People in Shared Lives households enjoy meals and other social times together as a household.
  • Shared Lives relationships are often very long lasting: some people have lived together or remained important parts of each other’s lives for decades.
  • The local Shared Lives scheme has the back up of a national network, policies, procedures, outcome measuring tools, quality assurance system, regulation and inspection: this is essential to maintaining the sector’s exceptional safeguarding record.
  • We believe that people’s health, wellbeing and independence are closely linked: people recover well in Shared Lives households from a hospital stay because they feel part of a supportive household and their community again.

Shared Lives is already independently shown to be lower cost and less risky way of supporting someone than traditional forms of care. It already helps thousands of people to live healthy, happy lives. For us innovation is not about cost cutting – we prioritise strong relationships and safety to live well.   

For any other questions, media enquiries, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or call 07392 313 500.

In response to media coverage 26.10.17

Shared Lives care about people who come out of hospital, especially older people and others who need extra support to live well. Shared Lives is all about the relationship match between Shared Lives carers and people coming out of hospital. We know that when people have chosen who they are going to share with, and are part of a family, they recover more quickly.

We have a long 40 year history of working in social care and we are proven to be one of the safest forms of care – for the last three years 92% of schemes have been rated by the CQC as outstanding or good, and none have been rated inadequate. Local Shared Lives schemes have the back up of a national network and quality assurance, regulation and inspection: this is essential to maintaining the sector’s exceptional safeguarding record.

We welcome innovation in health and social care services, for us it is not about cost-cutting – it’s about putting people first, building strong relationships and safety to recover and live well.

For any other questions, media enquiries, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 07392 313 500.

Read Alex Fox, CEO's blog - 'More than a room'

About Shared Lives

Shared Lives is a long-established, regulated and researched home-based support model which has a long history in social care and more recently has been developed to offer home from hospital and other kinds of healthcare, with the backing of the Dept Health and NHS England.

Shared Lives carers are recruited by their local CQC-registered Shared Lives scheme and put through a rigorous 3 – 6 month approval process, before being carefully matched with an adult who needs support.  Together, they share family and community life. Half of the14,000 people using Shared Lives move in with their Shared Lives carer to live as part of their household; half visit for day support or overnight breaks. 

Shared Lives is used by a people with a wide range of long-term support needs including learning disabilities, mental health problems, physical or sensory impairments. Some are older people with dementia, who typically use Shared Lives instead of visiting a care home when their family needs a break from caring. Some, such as care leavers and young disabled adults, learn independent living skills and put down roots in the community, to enable them to move into their own place without becoming isolated. Home from hospital care is a recent but promising development which has Dept Health funding.

Shared Lives in health

There are nearly 10,000 Shared Lives carers. They are all approved following rigorous recruitment and training by one of the UK’s 150 regulated local schemes. The Care Quality Commission rates Shared Lives as 92% good or excellent: better than all other forms of social care.

NHS England and seven NHS trusts are investing over £2m in scaling up Shared Lives as a new form of healthcare. When Shared Lives is used by, for instance, people recovering from stroke, the same safeguarding and matching processes are adapted to enable the patient to meet a potential Shared Lives carer and make a choice as to whether to stay in their house. The Shared Lives scheme supports and monitors the match. There is also a project specifically at supporting people being discharged from hospital which has funding from the Department of Health and Dunhill Medical Trust in 7 pilot sites.

What is the difference between Shared Lives and ‘Airbnb care rooms’?

The success of Shared Lives, which is now present in almost every UK area, stems from its values and practices which are very different from those reported about ‘care rooms’:

  • The well-being of the person coming out of hospital is put first, along with their choice and match with a Shared Lives carer.
  • Shared Lives carers are trained and paid to support and include someone in their family life, their incentive is not to make money (unlike the reports in the headlines). People in Shared Lives households enjoy meals and other social times together as a household.
  • Shared Lives relationships are often very long lasting: some people have lived together or remained important parts of each other’s lives for decades.
  • The local Shared Lives scheme has the back up of a national network, policies, procedures, outcome measuring tools, quality assurance system, regulation and inspection: this is essential to maintaining the sector’s exceptional safeguarding record.
  • We believe that people’s health, wellbeing and independence are closely linked: people recover well in Shared Lives households from a hospital stay because they feel part of a supportive household and their community again.

Shared Lives is already independently shown to be lower cost and less risky way of supporting someone than traditional forms of care. It already helps thousands of people to live healthy, happy lives. For us innovation is not about cost cutting – we prioritise strong relationships and safety to live well.   

For any other questions, media enquiries, please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or call 07392 313 500.

STOP PRESS
It is only five weeks to our UK Conference
UK Conference – 21st and 22nd November 2017
What: The only national learning event for people involved in Shared Lives and Homeshare - we will learn from each other and expert facilitators, hear from national leaders, and celebrate Shared Lives.  This year’s theme is Celebrating 25 years of Shared Lives Plus
Where:  Hilton Hotel Liverpool City Centre L1 8LW
When: 21st November (AGM, evening meal) and 22nd November conference.
Just to let you know that
We have made some changes to the workshop line up;
We have amalgamated two of the morning workshops into one “Meet the Chair and CEO of Shared Lives Plus and Help Line Live” and added another workshop “Safeguarding in Shared Lives”.  In the afternoon we have replaced the Whose Line is it Anyway” workshop with Recruiting Shared Lives carers”
Places to attend Conference have gone very fast;
⦁ There are only two 2 day passes for Conference, dinner and reception remaining.
⦁ One day passes for conference are becoming limited and several workshops are already full or nearly full.
If you would like to attend Conference please complete and return the attached booking form as soon as possible to secure your place, preferably before 1st November 2017 to allow us to finalise numbers and arrangements.
 
 

This week we will be showcasing Shared Lives and Homeshare at the National Children and Adult Services conference in Bournemouth.

 Shared Lives and Homeshare are personalised and community based approaches to care and support. Looking to develop Shared Lives or Homeshare in your area ? Those attending can find out more about our work and partnerships by visiting us at stand D14.

Not going to NCAS ? You can read our pdfShared Lives Plus Strategic Advice and Support Brochure for more information about what we can offer.

Shared Lives was highlighted this week as the best performing model in social care, again. Find out more here



The health and care system is still providing 'good care' but struggling to cope with increasing demand and rising costs. But Shared Lives offers an effective way for disabled and older people to get the support they need to live well according to the CQC's annual State of Care report released today. 

The report highlights the unique role of Shared Lives, a UK-wide approach which involves matching people who need care and support with carefully trained and approved Shared Lives carers who welcome others into their homes, either to live as part of a long term Shared Lives arrangement, for short breaks or for day support.

Alex Fox, CEO of Shared Lives Plus says, “This year’s CQC report on the State of health and care in England once again shows that Shared Lives outperforms all other forms of regulated social care. 

The inspectors identify the reasons for this as: teams of staff and Shared Lives carers who are ‘dedicated, enthusiastic and motivated by achieving positive outcomes for people’, the matching process, which ensures that people get to know each other before deciding to share their lives and strong leadership and relationships with other services. 

Shared Lives carers are coming under increasing pressure in some areas from budget cuts. It is vital that local areas value and invest in Shared Lives services, so that the model continues to be a growing way for people to live well at the heart of their communities.”

The report highlights a high-performing Shared Lives service, which provides long-term arrangements, short breaks, day support and emergency care for adults with a range of support needs, within Shared Lives carers’ own homes.

A person who uses Shared Lives said:

“Shared Lives are amazing. This is my home and I am made to feel part of the family, they are really nice and friendly.”

One Shared Lives carer said:

“We wanted to see what [the person’s] potential could be. They have gone from doing almost nothing to being outgoing and making decisions for themselves, including where they want to go and who they want to see. It’s been amazing to see the transformation."

Nearly 14,000 people use Shared Lives across the UK. Shared Lives is also used as a stepping stone for someone to get their own place. The outcomes can be startling, with people reporting feeling settled, valued and like they belong for the first time in their lives. They make friends and get involved in clubs, activities and volunteering, often for the first time. Shared Lives is well-placed to help local authorities as they balance tightening budgets. For someone with learning disabilities, Shared Lives costs less than other forms of care; on average £26,000 a year less. 

Notes to Editors

Shared Lives Plus’s UK wide network of local, regulated Shared Lives schemes individually match trained and approved Shared Lives carers with people who need their support. There is a Shared Lives scheme in almost every local authority area.

A Shared Lives carer shares their home and family life with an adult who needs care or support to help them live well.

For more information contact :

Phoebe Rowell
Communications Manager
07392 313500
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tuesday, 03 October 2017 15:42

The Emperor’s new clothes

Written by
 
Geraldine Cooney, NHS Programme Regional Officer for Shared Lives Plus, writes a guest blog about her work  on the Shared Lives Plus programme with NHS England.
 
Working on the Shared Lives Plus NHS programme with NHS England, I’ve been hearing a lot about health and social care integration. I’ve been reading and learning about how integration will empower patients to take control of their lives, how it will ‘dissolve the classic divide… between family doctors and hospitals, between physical and mental health, between health and social care, between prevention and treatment.’ 

Integration and personalisation is the cornerstone of all current NHS and government policies. There’s an awful lot of information out there – run a search online and you will be swamped- one study found 175 definitions of integrated care! The Better Care Fund is the main lever bringing health and social care organisations together to plan, fund and commission integrated services.  Personal Health Budgets (PHB’s), with support focused on how people want to live rather than just their health needs, are another important part of the integration agenda. It would be hard to disagree with any of these sensible ideas of joined up services and person centred care – integrated services that value people as individuals fits perfectly with the ethos and model of Shared Lives.  Our NHS programme is therefore well placed as part of the integration agenda, sitting within NHS England’s Integrated Personal Commissioning (IPC) service.

But what does integration mean in practice and how will we know if it is actually happening? I started to wonder about this back in February when an Audit Office report concluded that integration has been slower and less successful than envisaged. It found that although the Better Care Fund has increased joint working, this integration has not delivered better outcomes for patients, the NHS or Local Authorities. A further report from the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE) identified problems for integrated working as conflicting polices, different funding systems, different eligibility criteria for health and social care service and separate governance arrangements. SCIE said that the focus of integration on improving systems and processes didn’t necessarily translate into better care; they highlighted a need to identify what good integration actually looks and feels like to people using services.

It seems that putting integration into practice is harder than producing buzzwords and policy documents; and our experience at Shared Lives Plus certainly bears this out.  We have found some disconnect between government and NHS policy and what is happening on a local level within Clinical Commissioning Groups and Local Authorities. Many of us at Shared Lives are having conversations with health commissioners and hospital discharge teams, but the referrals coming in are via the usual routes – from social work teams who know and understand the Shared Lives model of old. Personal Health Budget’s sound like the ideal mechanism for funding Shared Lives arrangements, but we have not yet seen this happening in any significant way.

There have been times when I’ve felt like one of the townsfolk going along with the excitement about the Emperor’s magnificent new clothes, when in fact he is naked and nobody dares create upset by pointing this out. There is clearly much work still to be done in raising awareness of Shared Lives, in accessing referrals via integrated pathways and pooled budgets. In some areas of the country Integrated Personal Commissioning (IPC) demonstrator sites do appear to have clear ideas about commissioning Shared Lives through health, but in other areas it is very early days for the integrated systems, and too soon to see the effects in terms of funding Shared Lives arrangements.

On the positive side, we do have successes to share.  I’ve been encouraged by seeing first-hand how health and social care integration is being played out in some of our match funded areas.  Clinical Commissioning Group’s (CCG’s), Local authorities and Shared Lives schemes are talking to each other and demonstrating a real enthusiasm for doing things differently. New relationships are being formed, awareness and understanding has increased on both sides, and new pathways and processes are starting to take shape.  Some of our colleagues have found new ways of working with health and social care commissioners.  For example, Bolton Shared Lives scheme are sitting on the joint allocation panels at the CCG, where Shared Lives is the first option for care and support. Bolton are also receiving referrals into Shared Lives via the community mental health teams.

Our team recently visited Northumberland Shared Lives to learn from schemes working in health outside our match funded programme.  Northumbria NHS are a NHS England vanguard site trying a new model of care called a ‘Multi speciality Community Provider’ (MCP).  Julie Shepherd, the Shared Lives manager told us how having shared offices, shared back-office systems and pooled budgets means that awareness of Shared Lives is high in both health and social care in Northumbria, resulting in seamless commissioning and funding pathways.  In this environment Julie says;  ‘accessing Shared lives is an ‘open door’ for health and social care professionals’. I found it really refreshing to see Shared Lives Northumberland positioned as the first option on the ‘Accomodation and Care homes’ page of the Northumbria NHS website (above Care homes!).

We all know the pressures on the NHS; perhaps we just need to be more patient. There is change in the offing – the government’s aim is for health and social care integration by 2020 and an ‘integration standard’ is being developed – to show what ‘good’ looks like. NHS England have produced an expansion plan for personal health budgets with targets for CCG’s to meet. NHS England say that PHB’s should now be routinely offered; they expect the number of people with PHB’s to increase rapidly, becoming ‘business as usual’ by 2021.

We know that integration aims to close the divide between people and the professionals who serve them and that it should start and end with people, not structures.
 
National voices came up with the following definition after talking to people about the meaning of integration;‘my care is planned with people who work together to understand me and my carer(s), put me in control, coordinate and deliver services to achieve my best outcomes’
 
It seems that integration is playing out in a variety of ways and no one model will suit all contexts. People themselves are the best integrators of care; and they will know if it’s happening, or not. We all want to see change from the ground up; our NHS project will be highlighting integration challenges as well as success stories that enable and transform peoples’ lives.
 
Page 10 of 31

FAQ Didn't Solve Your Problem?

Get Direct Access to the Team Via Phone, Email or Live Chat.

Contact Us

If you have not received new LOG IN details in the last few days then you will be unable to log in here until you have done so. Please do not attempt to log in as you will be locked out

Thank you for logging in. Now please feel free to visit the private sections of the site.